JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/49043
FullText URL 66_6_469.pdf
Author Shiozaki, Yasuyuki| Ito, Yasuo| Sugimoto, Yoshihisa| Tomioka, Masao| Shimokawa, Tetsuya| Mazaki, Tetsuro| Koshimune, Koichiro| Tanaka, Masato| Ozaki, Toshifumi|
Abstract In this study, we studied the relationship between fracture patterns and motor function recovery in 70 consecutive patients with cervical spinal cord injury. Fractures were categorized into 6 fracture types and subdivided into stages according to the Allen-Ferguson classification system:compressive flexion (CF), distractive flexion (DF), compressive extension (CE), distractive extension (DE), vertical compression (VC) and lateral flexion (LF). Paralysis was evaluated using the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale at the time of injury and 3 months afterwards. The residual rate of complete motor palsy (ASIA grade A or B) at the final examination was higher in those patients with DE fractures than those with CF, DF or CE. The final outcomes were as follows. Of the 14 patients who were classified with CF fractures, residual palsy was frequently seen in patients who had stage 5 injury. Of the 27 patients with DF fractures, residual palsy occurred in about half of the patients who had stage 4 or 5 injury. Of the 18 patients with CE fractures, residual palsy occurred in half of the patients with stage 3 injury or higher. Finally, of the 7 patients with DE fractures, the rate of residual palsy was high even for the stage 1 and 2 cases;indeed, all DE patients who had complete motor palsy at the first examination had residual palsy at the final examination. Accordingly, we conclude that motor recovery may be related to fracture pattern.
Keywords cervical spinal cord injury motor function recovery fracture patterns
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2012-12
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume66
Issue issue6
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 469
End Page 473
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2012 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 23254581
Web of Science KeyUT 000312966100006
Author Sasaki, Tsuyoshi| Tazawa, Hiroshi| Hasei, Jo| Kunisada, Toshiyuki| Yoshida, Aki| Hashimoto, Yuuri| Yano, Shuya| Yoshida, Ryosuke| Uno, Futoshi| Kagawa, Shunsuke| Morimoto, Yuki| Urata, Yasuo| Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi| Ozaki, Toshifumi|
Published Date 2012-08-01
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume124
Issue issue2
Content Type Journal Article
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/48692
FullText URL 66_4_363.pdf
Author Tanaka, Masato| Sugimoto, Yoshihiro| Misawa, Haruo| Takigawa, Tomoyuki| Kunisada, Toshiyuki| Ozaki, Toshifumi|
Abstract Spinal deformity is an important clinical manifestation after surgery for spinal cord tumors. One-third of patients who receive laminectomies and irradiation of the spinal column develop scoliosis, kyphosis, or kyphoscoliosis. Recent reports indicate good results after scoliosis surgery using segmental pedicle screws and a navigation system, but these reported studies have not included surgery for post-laminectomy kyphosis. Hooks and wires are ineffective in such patients who undergo laminectomy, and there are also high perioperative risks with insertion of pedicle screws because landmarks have been lost. Here, we report on the 5-year follow-up of a 13-year-old male patient with post-laminectomy and post-irradiation thoracic kyphoscoliosis after surgical treatment of spinal astrocytoma. Posterior segmental pedicle screw fixation was performed safely using a computer-assisted technique. The authors present the first case report for treatment of this condition using a navigation system.
Keywords astrocytoma scoliosis kyphoscoliosis navigation segmental pedicle screw fixation
Amo Type Case Report
Published Date 2012-08
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume66
Issue issue4
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 363
End Page 368
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2012 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 22918210
Web of Science KeyUT 000307918900010
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/48562
FullText URL 66_3_231.pdf
Author Takahashi, Kingo| Hayashi, Masamichi| Fujii, Toshihiro| Kawamura, Kenji| Ozaki, Toshifumi|
Abstract The objective of early rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is to increase the muscle strength of the lower extremities. Closed kinetic chain (CKC) exercise induces co-contraction of the agonist and antagonist muscles. The purpose of this study was to compare the postoperative muscle strength/mass of subjects who performed our new CKC exercise (new rehabilitation group:group N) from week 4, and subjects who received traditional rehabilitation alone (traditional rehabilitation group:group T). The subjects stood on the device and maintained balance. Then, low-frequency stimulation waves were applied to 2 points each in the anterior and posterior region of the injured thigh 3 times a week for 3 months. Measurement of muscle strength was performed 4 times (before the start, and then once a month). Muscle mass was evaluated in CT images of the extensor and flexor muscles of 10 knees (10 subjects) in each group. The injured legs of group N showed significant improvement after one month compared to group T. The cross-sectional area of the extensor muscles of the injured legs tended to a show a greater increase at 3 months in group N. This rehabilitation method makes it possible to contract fast-twitch muscles, which may be a useful for improving extensor muscle strength after ACL reconstruction.
Keywords anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction closed kinetic chain electrical muscle stimulation standing-shaking-board exercise
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2012-06
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume66
Issue issue3
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 231
End Page 237
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2012 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 22729103
Web of Science KeyUT 000305669700006
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/48560
FullText URL 66_3_213.pdf
Author Kataoka, Masaki| Kunisada, Toshiyuki| Tanaka, Masato| Takeda, Ken| Itani, Satoru| Sugimoto, Yoshihisa| Misawa, Haruo| Senda, Masuo| Nakahara, Shinnosuke| Ozaki, Toshifumi|
Abstract There are a variety of treatment options for patients with spinal metastasis, and predicting prognosis is essential for selecting the proper treatment. The purpose of the present study was to identify the significant prognostic factors for the survival of patients with spinal metastasis. We retrospectively reviewed 143 patients with spinal metastasis. The median age was 61 years. Eleven factors reported previously were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards model:gender, age, performance status, neurological deficits, pain, type of primary tumor, metastasis to major organs, previous chemotherapy, disease-free interval before spinal metastasis, multiple spinal metastases, and extra-spinal bone metastasis. The average survival of study patients after the first visit to our clinic was 22 months. Multivariate survival analysis demonstrated that type of primary tumor (hazard ratio [HR]=6.80, p<0.001), metastasis to major organs (HR=2.01, p=0.005), disease-free interval before spinal metastasis (HR=1.77, p=0.028), and extra-spinal bone metastasis (HR=1.75, p=0.017) were significant prognostic factors. Type of primary tumor was the most powerful prognostic factor. Other prognostic factors may differ among the types of primary tumor and may also be closely associated with primary disease activity. Further analysis of factors predicting prognosis should be conducted with respect to each type of primary tumor to help accurately predict prognosis.
Keywords spine metastasis survival prognostic factor cancer
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2012-06
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume66
Issue issue3
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 213
End Page 219
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2012 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 22729101
Web of Science KeyUT 000305669700004
Author Morimoto, Yuki| Ozaki, Toshifumi|
Published Date 2011-12-01
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume123
Issue issue3
Content Type Journal Article
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/47262
FullText URL 65_6_369.pdf
Author Terada, Chuji| Yoshida, Aki| Nasu, Yoshihisa| Mori, Shuji| Tomono, Yasuko| Tanaka, Masato| Takahashi, Hideo K.| Nishibori, Masahiro| Ozaki, Toshifumi| Nishida, Keiichiro|
Abstract We investigated the expression and localization of high-mobility group box chromosomal protein-1 (HMGB-1) in human osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage in relation to the histopathological grade of cartilage destruction, and examined the role of HMGB-1 in the regulation of proinflammatory cytokine expression in chondrocytes. An immunohistochemical study demonstrated that total HMGB-1-positive cell ratios increase as the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) histological grade increased. The population of cytoplasmic HMGB-1-positive chondrocytes was especially increased in the deep layers of higher-grade cartilage. The ratios and localization of receptors for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) expression by chondrocytes in Grade 2, 3, and 4 were significantly higher than those in Grade 1. In vitro stimulation with IL-1β, but not TNFα, significantly upregulated the expression of HMGB-1 mRNA by human OA chondrocytes. Both IL-1β and TNFα promoted the translocation of HMGB-1 from nuclei to cytoplasm. IL-1β and TNFα secretions were stimulated at higher levels of HMGB-1. The results of our study suggest the involvement of HMGB-1 in the pathogenesis of cartilage destruction in OA.
Keywords HMGB-1 RAGE chondrocyte osteoarthritis cartilage
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2011-12
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume65
Issue issue6
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 369
End Page 377
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2011 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 22189477
Web of Science KeyUT 000298516900003
Author Shimamura, Yasunori| Inoue, Madoka| Ozawa, Masatugu| Kanazawa, Tomoko| Saitou, Taiichi| Nakahara, Ryuichi| Noda, Tomoyuki| Nishida, Keiichiro| Ozaki, Toshifumi|
Published Date 2011-08-01
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume123
Issue issue2
Content Type Journal Article
Author Miyake, Yoshiaki| Furumatsu, Takayuki| Kubota, Satoshi| Kawata, Kazumi| Ozaki, Toshifumi| Takigawa, Masaharu|
Published Date 2011-06-03
Publication Title Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume volume409
Issue issue2
Content Type Journal Article
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/46634
FullText URL 65_3_211.pdf
Author Nakanishi, Kazuo| Yamane, Kentarou| Tanaka, Masato| Misawa, Haruo| Saiga, Kenta| Ozaki, Toshifumi|
Abstract Here we report a case of surgery for kyphosis of the thoracolumbar spine in an elderly patient, in whom surgery was performed because the patient had developed intractable digestive symptoms. The case was that of a 76-year-old female with complaints of back pain and dysphagia. When videofluoroscopic examination (VF) of swallowing was performed in the cardia of the stomach, images that indicated stagnation and the reflux of food were observed. It was easier for the patient to swallow food in the extension position. We performed corrective fusion of the posterior spine. After the surgery, the kyphosis angle was improved to 27°, the patient's back pain was alleviated, and it became easier for the patient to swallow food. VF also showed that the patient's difficulties with the passage of food had improved. We believe that surgery is a good treatment option for cases of kyphosis with digestive symptoms and deteriorating activities of daily living (ADL), even in the absence of pain and paralysis. VF is also useful for performing evaluations before and after surgery.
Keywords kyphosis dysphagia videofluoroscopic examination of swallowing (VF) fusion
Amo Type Case Report
Published Date 2011-06
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume65
Issue issue3
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 211
End Page 214
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2011 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 21709720
Web of Science KeyUT 000292017500009
Title Alternative Japanese guidelines for the treatment of hip fractures in the elderly
FullText URL 122_253.pdf
Author Noda, Tomoyuki| Ozaki, Toshifumi|
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Published Date 2010-12-01
Volume volume122
Issue issue3
Start Page 253
End Page 257
ISSN 0030-1558
language 日本語
Copyright Holders Copyright (c) 2010 岡山医学会
File Version publisher
DOI 10.4044/joma.122.253
NAID 130004903185
Author Saiga, Kenta| Furumatsu, Takayuki| Yoshida, Aki| Masuda, Shin| Takihira, Shota| Abe, Nobuhiro| Ozaki, Toshifumi|
Published Date 2010-11-12
Publication Title Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume volume402
Issue issue2
Content Type Journal Article
Author Fujiwara, Kazuo| Endo, Hirosuke| Miyake, Yoshiaki| Ozaki, Toshifumi|
Published Date 2010-08-02
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume122
Issue issue2
Content Type Journal Article
Author Furumatsu, Takayuki| Ozaki, Toshifumi| Asahara, Hiroshi|
Published Date 2010-08-02
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume122
Issue issue2
Content Type Journal Article
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/40011
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Honda, Mitsugi| Arita, Seizaburo| Mitani, Shigeru| Takeda, Yoshihiro| Ozaki, Toshifumi| Inamura, Keiji| Kanazawa, Susumu|
Abstract Plain X-ray radiography is frequently used for the diagnosis of developmental dislocation of the hip (DDH). The aim of this study was to construct a diagnostic support system for DDH based on clinical findings obtained from the X-ray images of 154 female infants with confirmed diagnoses made by orthopedists. The data for these subjects were divided into 2 groups. The Min-Max method of nonlinear analysis was applied to the data from Group 1 to construct the diagnostic support system based on the measurement of 4 items in X-ray images:the outward displacement rate, upward displacement rate, OE angle, and alpha angle. This system was then applied to the data from Group 2, and the results were compared between the 2 groups to verify the reliability of the system. We obtained good results that matched the confirmed diagnoses of orthopedists with an accuracy of 85.9%.
Keywords X-ray image developmental dislocation of the hip acetabular dysplasia radiographic findings nonlinear multivariate analysis infant hip joint diagnostic support system
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2010-06
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume64
Issue issue3
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 189
End Page 196
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 20596130
Web of Science KeyUT 000279094300005
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/40007
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Furumatsu, Takayuki| Ozaki, Toshifumi|
Abstract Epigenetics is an essential mechanism to control gene expression and fundamental cellular processes. DNA methylation in CpG-rich promoters correlates with gene silencing. Histone modification including histone acetylation and deacetylation determines the stability of the chromatin structure. Condensed chromatin (heterochromatin), which has a higher-order histone-DNA structure, prevents the access of transcriptional activators to their target genes. The fundamental unit of eukaryotic chromatin consists of 146 bp of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer. Posttranslational modifications of the histone tail and the chromatin remodeling complex disrupt histone-DNA contacts and induce nucleosome mobilization. Histone acetylation of specific lysine residues in the histone tail plays a crucial role in epigenetic regulation. Histone acetylation is a dynamic process regulated by the antagonistic actions of 2 families of enzymes - the histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and the histone deacetylases (HDACs). The balance between histone acetylation and deacetylation serves as a key epigenetic mechanism for transcription factor-dependent gene expression and the developmental process. We review emerging evidence that DNA methylation, histone acetylation modified by HAT and/or HDAC, and transcription factor-associated molecules contribute to a mechanism that can alter chromatin structure, gene expression, and cellular differentiation during chondrogenesis.
Keywords epigenetics DNA methylation histone acetylation and HAT histone deacetylation and HDAC chondrogenesis
Amo Type Review
Published Date 2010-06
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume64
Issue issue3
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 155
End Page 161
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 20596126
Web of Science KeyUT 000279094300001
Author Mimura, Hidefumi| Fujiwara, Hiroyasu| Hiraki, Takao| Gobara, Hideo| Shibamoto, Kentaro| Kimata, Yoshihiro| Ozaki, Toshifumi| Sasaki, Satoru| Kanazawa, Susumu|
Published Date 2010-04-01
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume122
Issue issue1
Content Type Journal Article
Author Tanaka, Masato| Sugimoto, Yoshihisa| Misawa, Haruo| Takahata, Tomohiro| Ozaki, Toshifumi|
Published Date 2010-04-01
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume122
Issue issue1
Content Type Journal Article
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32855
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Shimamura, Yasunori| Nishida, Keiichiro| Imatani, Junya| Noda, Tomoyuki| Hashizume, Hiroyuki| Ohtsuka, Aiji| Ozaki, Toshifumi|
Abstract <p>We biomechanically evaluated the bone fixation rigidity of an ONI plate (Group I) during fixation of experimentally created transcondylar humerus fractures in cadaveric elbows, which are the most frequently observed humeral fractures in the elderly, and compared it with the rigidity achieved by 3 conventional fixation methods:an LCP reconstruction plate 3.5 using a locking mechanism (Group II), a conventional reconstruction plate 3.5 (CRP) with a cannulated cancellous screw (Group III), and a CRP with 2 cannulated cancellous screws (CS) in a crisscross orientation (Group IV). In the axial loading test, the mean failure loads were:Group I, 98.9+/-32.6;Group II, 108.5+/-27.2;Group III, 50.0+/-7.5;and Group IV, 34.5+/-12.2 (N). Group I fixations failed at a significantly higher load than those of Groups III and IV (p0.05). In the extension loading test, the mean failure loads were:Group I, 34.0+/-12.4;Group II, 51.0+/-14.8;Group III, 19.3+/-6.0;and Group IV, 14.7+/-3.1 (N). Group IV fixations showed a significantly lower failure load than those of Group I (p0.05). The fixation rigidities against mechanical loading by the ONI plate and LCP plate were comparable. These results suggested that an ONI system might be superior to the CRP and CS method, and comparable to the LCP method in terms of fixation rigidity for distal humerus fractures.</p>
Keywords distal humerus fracture biomechanics internal fixation elderly
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2010-04
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume64
Issue issue2
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 115
End Page 120
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 20424666
Web of Science KeyUT 000276996900005
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32851
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Shintani, Mai| Senda, Masuo| Takayanagi, Tomoko| Katayama, Yoshimi| Furusawa, Kazunari| Okutani, Tamami| Kataoka, Masaki| Ozaki, Toshifumi|
Abstract <p>To assess the effects of service dogs on health-related quality of life (HRQOL), we conducted a survey of 10 service dog owners using SF-36v2 (Medical Outcomes Study 36 Item Short-Form Health Survey Version 2.0) and compared it with a matched control group of people with physical disabilities who did not have service dogs but were eligible for one. The scores for mental health and role emotional of service dog owners were relatively high, and their mental component summary was higher than the general population norm. These results indicate that service dogs affect the mentality of their owners. The comparison with the control group indicated that service dogs alleviate the mental burden of daily activities, and subjectively improved the physical functioning of their owners. This study showed that service dogs have positive functional and mental effects on their disabled owners.</p>
Keywords service dog HRQOL SF-36v2 people with physical disability
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2010-04
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume64
Issue issue2
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 109
End Page 113
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 20424665
Web of Science KeyUT 000276996900004