JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/55201
FullText URL 71_3_191.pdf
Author Kobayashi, Katsuhiro| Akiyama, Tomoyuki| Agari, Takashi| Sasaki, Tatsuya| Shibata, Takashi| Hanaoka, Yoshiyuki| Akiyama, Mari| Endoh, Fumika| Oka, Makio| Date, Isao|
Abstract  Electroencephalogram (EEG) data include broadband electrical brain activity ranging from infra-slow bands (< 0.1 Hz) to traditional frequency bands (e.g., the approx. 10 Hz alpha rhythm) to high-frequency bands of up to 500 Hz. High-frequency oscillations (HFOs) including ripple and fast ripple oscillations (80-200 Hz and>200 / 250 Hz, respectively) are particularly of note due to their very close relationship to epileptogenicity, with the possibility that they could function as a surrogate biomarker of epileptogenicity. In contrast, physiological high-frequency activity plays an important role in higher brain functions, and the differentiation between pathological / epileptic and physiological HFOs is a critical issue, especially in epilepsy surgery. HFOs were initially recorded with intracranial electrodes in patients with intractable epilepsy as part of a long-term invasive seizure monitoring study. However, fast oscillations (FOs) in the ripple and gamma bands (40-80 Hz) are now noninvasively detected by scalp EEG and magnetoencephalography, and thus the scope of studies on HFOs /FOs is rapidly expanding.
Keywords fast oscillations, epilepsy electroencephalogram time-frequency analysis
Amo Type Review
Published Date 2017-06
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume71
Issue issue3
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 191
End Page 200
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2017 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 28655938
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/51865
FullText URL 67_5_293.pdf
Author Takeuchi, Akihito| Ogino, Tatsuya| Hanafusa, Kaoru| Morooka, Teruko| Oka, Makio| Yorifuji, Takashi| Ohtsuka, Yoko|
Abstract To clarify the relationship between attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) and pervasive developmental disorders (PDD), we investigated the common features and differences of these disorders in neuropsychological profiles. The subjects were 4 groups of Japanese boys aged 6 to 15 years, categorized by diagnosis:AD/HD (n=20), PDD with comorbid AD/HD (PDD+:n=16), PDD without comorbid AD/HD (PDD-:n=8), and typically developing (n=60). We evaluated executive function (EF) through verbal and visuospatial memory tasks, the Go/NoGo task, and the color-word matching Stroop task. We performed a categorical analysis to estimate the effects of the 3 disorders on EF and a dimensional analysis to estimate the effects of symptom scales on EF. We found that the AD/HD and PDD+ subjects had negative effects on verbal working memory and intra-individual response variability. The severity of these impairments was positively correlated with the inattentiveness score. The subjects with a PDD+ or PDD- diagnosis had poorer scores on interference control;the severity of this impairment was correlated with the PDD symptom score. Impairments in visuospatial working memory were detected in the AD/HD and PDD- groups but not in the PDD+ group. Impairments in inhibition of the pre-potent response were noted in all 3 categories. AD/HD and PDD share neuropsychological features, though each disorder has a specific impairment pattern. Our findings partially support the idea that AD/HD and PDD are on a spectrum.
Keywords attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder pervasive developmental disorder executive function working memory color-word matching Stroop task
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2013-10
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume67
Issue issue5
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 293
End Page 303
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2013 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 24145729
Web of Sience KeyUT 000325836100003
Related Url http://ousar.lib.okayama-u.ac.jp/metadata/52244
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/49385
FullText URL 66_5_377.pdf
Author Morooka, Teruko| Ogino, Tatsuya| Takeuchi, Akihito| Hanafusa, Kaoru| Oka, Makio| Ohtsuka, Yoko|
Abstract Both selective attention and response inhibition can be assessed through the Stroop task and the Go/NoGo task (Go/NoGo). The color-word matching Stroop task (cwmStroop) differs from the traditional Stroop task in ways that make it easy to administer, and it enables the examiners to analyze reaction time. It is expected that the cwmStroop and Go/NoGo tasks will be useful as clinical assessments for children with developmental disorders and in combination with functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. The objectives of this study were to elucidate the pattern of developmental change in cwmStroop scores and Go/NoGo scores and to determine whether and how cwmStroop scores are related to Go/NoGo scores. The subjects consisted of 108 healthy Japanese children aged 6-14 years. We found that cwmStroop and Go/NoGo scores displayed clear developmental changes between 6 and 14 years of age. The childrenʼs scores on the 2 tasks followed different developmental courses, however, and the correlation between scores on the two tasks was weak on the whole. These results indicate that the cwmStroop and Go/NoGo tasks tap different aspects of selective attention and response inhibition. Therefore it is expected that the combination of both tests will be useful in the multifaceted assessment of selective attention and response inhibition in childhood.
Keywords color-word matching Stroop task Go/NoGo task selective attention response inhibition
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2012-10
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume66
Issue issue5
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 377
End Page 386
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2012 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 23093056
Web of Sience KeyUT 000310253900002
Author Oka, Makio|
Published Date 2003-09-30
Publication Title
Content Type Thesis or Dissertation