JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/55203
FullText URL 71_3_209.pdf
Author Xin, Zhao| Tsuda, Toshihide| Doi, Hiroyuki|
Abstract We evaluated how exposure to airborne volatile organic compounds emitted from a plastic recycling facility affected nearby residents, in a cross-sectional study. Individuals>10 years old were randomly sampled from 50 households at five sites and given questionnaires to complete. We categorized the subjects by distance from the recycling facility and used this as a proxy measure for pollutant exposure. We sought to improve on a preceding study by generating new findings, improving methods for questionnaire distribution and collection, and refining site selection. We calculated the odds of residents living 500 or 900 m away from the facility reporting mucocutaneous and respiratory symptoms using a reference group of residents 2,800 m away. Self-reported nasal congestion (odds ratio=3.0, 95% confidence interval=1.02-8.8), eczema (5.1, 1.1-22.9), and sore throat (3.9, 1.1-14.1) were significantly higher among residents 500 m from the facility. Those 900 m away were also considerably more likely to report experiencing eczema (4.6, 1.4-14.9). Air pollution was found responsible for significantly increased reports of mucocutaneous and respiratory symptoms among nearby residents. Our findings confirm the effects of pollutants emitted from recycling facilities on residents’ health and clarify that study design differences did not affect the results.
Keywords air pollutants volatile organic compounds recycling facility mucocutaneous symptoms respiratory symptoms
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2017-06
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume71
Issue issue3
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 209
End Page 217
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2017 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 28655940
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/45268
FullText URL 65_2_97.pdf
Author Tsuchihashi, Yuuki| Yorifuji, Takashi| Takao, Soshi| Suzuki, Etsuji| Mori, Shigeru| Doi, Hiroyuki| Tsuda, Toshihide|
Abstract Seasonal influenza infection is a major challenge in public health. The term "seasonal influenza" refers to the typical increase in the number of influenza patients in the winter season in temperature zones. However, it is not clear how environmental factors within a single flu season affect influenza infection in a human population. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of temperature and humidity in the 2006-7 flu season on the onset of seasonal influenza using a case-crossover study. We targeted patients who attended one pediatric clinic in Okayama city, Japan and who were diagnosed as being infected with the seasonal influenza virus. Using 2 references (time-stratified and symmetric bidirectional design), we estimated the effects of average temperature and relative humidity from the onset day (lag0) to 10 days before (lag10). The total number of subjects was 419, and their onset days ranged from 26 December 2006 to 30 April 2007. While the onset was significantly associated with lower temperature, relative humidity was not related. In particular, temperatures before the 3-day incubation period had higher-magnitude odds ratios. For example, the odds ratio and 95% confidence interval for average temperature at time lag 8 was 1.12 (1.08-1.17) per 1.0℃ decrease. Low environmental temperature significantly increased the risk of seasonal influenza onset within the 2006-7 winter season.
Keywords seasonal influenza in humans temperature humidity case-crossover study
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2011-04
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume65
Issue issue2
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 97
End Page 103
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2011 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 21519367
Web of Science KeyUT 000289818800005
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Liu, Yangyang| Mitsuhashi, Toshiharu| Yamakawa, Michiyo| Sasai, Megumi| Tsuda, Toshihide| Doi, Hiroyuki| Hamada, Jun|
Keywords Elderly Disability Body mass index Long-term care insurance Unhealthy behaviors
Published Date 2019-11-29
Publication Title PeerJ
Volume volume7
Publisher PeerJ
Start Page e8146
ISSN 2167-8359
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
OAI-PMH Set 岡山大学
Copyright Holders © 2019 Liu et al.
File Version publisher
PubMed ID 31803538
DOI 10.7717/peerj.8146
Web of Science KeyUT 000499696500006
Related Url isVersionOf https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.8146
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/54415
FullText URL 70_3_167.pdf
Author Sugihara, Satoshi| Doi, Hiroyuki| Kato, Masahiko| Mitoh, Yoshihiro| Tsuda, Toshihide| Ikeda, Satoru|
Abstract Aflatoxin (AFT) contamination is frequent in foods grown in tropical regions, including rice. Although AFTs are generally not found in temperate-region foods, global warming has affected typical temperate-region climates, potentially permitting the contamination of foods with AFT-producing Aspergillus flavus (A. flavus). Here we investigated the AFT production in rice during storage under natural climate conditions in Japan. We examined AFTs in brown rice and rough rice artificially contaminated with A. flavus for 1 year in Japan, and we subjected AFTs in white rice to the same treatment in airtight containers and examined the samples in warm and cold seasons, simulating the storage of white rice in general households. In the brown rice, AFTs increased after 2 months (March) and peaked after 9 months (October). The AFT contamination in the rough rice was minimal. After the polishing and cooking of the brown rice, AFTs were undetectable. In the white rice stored in airtight containers, AFTs increased after 1 month (August) and peaked after 2 months (September). Minimal AFTs were detected in the cold season. Thus, AFT contamination in rice may occur in temperate regions following A. flavus contamination. The storage of rice as rough rice could provide be useful for avoiding AFT contamination.
Keywords Aspergillus flavus aflatoxin rice temperate region storage
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2016-06
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume70
Issue issue3
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 167
End Page 173
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2016 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 27339205
Web of Science KeyUT 000379406100003
Author 土居 弘幸|
Published Date 1989-09-30
Publication Title
Content Type Thesis or Dissertation