JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32642
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Bai, Liyan| Naomoto, Yoshio| Miyazaki, Masahiro| Orita, Kunzo| Namba, Masayoshi|
Abstract <p>The present experiment was undertaken to study what types of human cancers are responsive to the antiproliferative effects of suramin. The human malignant cells used were as follows: cervical cancer (HeLa), mammary cancer (MCF-7), bladder cancer (EJ), hepatoma (HuH-7, PLC/PRF/5), embryonal carcinoma (PA-1), in vitro transformed fibroblasts (KMST-6, SUSM-1, VA-13), five myeloma cell lines (KMM-1, KMS-5, KMS-11, KMS-12, RPMI 8226), Burkitt's lymphoma (Raji), acute promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60), chronic myelocytic leukemia (K562), Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen positive lymphoblastoid cells (KMS-9). The cells were treated with 25 to 100 micrograms/ml suramin for 72h. Proliferation of HuH-7 and two human myeloma cells (KMS-11 and KMS-12) was remarkably inhibited, and that of PA-1, PLC/PRF/5, KMST-6, two other myeloma cell lines (KMM-1 and KMS-5), Raji and HL-60, was moderately inhibited. In order to confirm part of the results obtained from in vitro experiments, in vivo experiments were also undertaken. The growth of HuH-7 cells transplanted subcutaneously into nude mice was significantly suppressed by intravenous injection of suramin. We discussed the possibility that certain types of human cancers, the growth of which seemed to be more or less dependent on polypeptide growth factors, might be sensitive to the antiproliferative effects of suramin.</p>
Keywords suramin anticancer drug human cancers
Amo Type Article
Published Date 1992-12
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume46
Issue issue6
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 457
End Page 463
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 1485540
Web of Science KeyUT A1992KE49600008
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32182
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Miyazaki, Masahiro| Bai, Liyan| Tsuboi, So| Seshimo, Ken| Namba, Masayoshi|
Abstract <p>Effects of antioxidants, such as superoxide dismutase, vitamin C, vitamin E, 4-(0-benzylphenoxy)-N-methylbutylamine hydrochloride (bifemelane), and selenite on survival of adult rat hepatocytes were examined under normoxic and hyperoxic conditions in serum-free primary culture. The tested antioxidants, except for vitamin C, significantly increased the survival rate of hepatocytes under the normoxic condition (under air). Thus, even the normoxic culture condition is hyperoxic for hepatocytes. Elevation of oxygen tension (40% O2) caused severe morphologic degeneration of hepatocytes and remarkable decrease in the survival rate of the cells. Addition of the antioxidants effectively protected hepatocytes from the morphologic degeneration, and significantly improved the survival of the cells under the hyperoxic condition. These findings indicate that the antioxidants can maintain the long-term survival of hepatocytes in serum-free primary culture.</p>
Keywords oxugen tension hepatocytes serum-free primary culture survival antioxidants
Amo Type Article
Published Date 1991-12
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume45
Issue issue6
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 441
End Page 444
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 1781300
Web of Science KeyUT A1991GX45300006
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/30464
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Miyazaki, Masahiro| Bai, Liyan| Sato, Jiro|
Abstract <p>To select a suitable medium for serum-free primary culture of adult rat hepatocytes, ten commercially-available synthetic media were compared for their ability to maintain the cells under serum-free and serum-supplemented conditions with special reference to attachment, survival and albumin secretion. It was found that Williams' medium E and DM-160 medium were the best among the ten media for maintaining hepatocytes under serum-free conditions in primary culture.</p>
Keywords adult rat hepatocytes serum-free primary culture maintenance Williams' medium E DM-160 medium
Amo Type Article
Published Date 1990-02
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume44
Issue issue1
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 9
End Page 12
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 2184639
Web of Science KeyUT A1990CT06800002
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/30417
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Jahan, Israt| Bai, Liyan| Iijima, Mikio| Kondo, Tadashi| Namba, Masayoshi|
Abstract <p>The establishment of a model system of neoplastic transformation of normal human cells has been attempted with a chemical carcinogen, 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO). In the course of these experiments, it was noticed that immortalization of human cells is a multi-step process involving several mutational genetic events. Thus, chromosomal changes which occurred during the process of immortalization of human fibroblasts were examined. To accomplish immortalization, fibroblasts obtained from an embryo were repeatedly treated with 10<sub>-6</sub>M4NQO from primary culture to passage 51 (59 treatments in total). Before immortalization, some chromosomes (especially, chromosomes 2, 6, 8, 10, 11, 12, 15, 19, and 20), were lost at a relatively high frequency. After immortalization, the chromosomes distributed so broadly in the triploid to hypotetraploid region without a distinct modal number or without marker chromosomes that it was difficult to identify the specific chromosomes related to the immortalization of human cells. No specific structural chromosomal changes were detected. Although the significance of such chromosome changes in relation to immortalization is not clear, the loss of some specific chromosomes suggests that genes which are involved in cellular aging and which suppress immortalization may have been lost in the immortalization process.</p>
Keywords human cells chromosomes aging immortalization 4NQO
Amo Type Article
Published Date 1995-02
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume49
Issue issue1
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 25
End Page 28
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 7762406
Web of Science KeyUT A1995QK32500004