Author 荒尾 雄二郎|
Published Date 1990-12-31
Publication Title
Content Type Thesis or Dissertation
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/48963
FullText URL 66_5_387.pdf
Author Chikasue, Kumiko| Kimura, Miyuki| Ikeda, Kazuyuki| Ohnishi, Takuma| Kawanishi, Satoshi| Iio, Tomoe| Kataoka, Mikio| Arao, Yujiro|
Abstract To determine whether exhaled breath contains Torque teno virus (TTV) or not, we tested exhaled breath condensate (EBC) samples by semi-nested PCR assay. We detected TTV DNA in 35% (7/20) of EBC samples collected from the mouth of one of the authors, demonstrating that TTV DNA is excreted in exhaled breath with moderate frequency. TTV DNA was detected also in oral EBC samples from 4 of 6 other authors, indicating that TTV DNA excretion in exhaled breath is not an exception but rather a common phenomenon. Furthermore, the same assay could amplify TTV DNA from room air condensate (RAC) samples collected at distances of 20 and 40cm from a human face with 40 (8/20) and 35% (7/20) positive rates, respectively. TTV transmission has been reported to occur during infancy. These distances seem equivalent to that between an infant and its household members while caring for the infant. Taken together, it seems that exhaled breath is one of the possible transmission routes of TTV. We also detected TTV DNA in 25% (10/40) of RAC samples collected at a distance of more than 180cm from any human face, suggesting the risk of airborne infection with TTV in a room.
Keywords Torque teno virus exhaled breath airborne infection polymerase chain reaction
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2012-10
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume66
Issue issue5
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 387
End Page 397
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2012 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 23093057
Web of Science KeyUT 000310253900003
Related Url http://ousar.lib.okayama-u.ac.jp/metadata/49508
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32190
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Arao, Yujiro| Hatano, Atsushi| Yamada, Masao| Uno, Fumio| Nii, Shiro|
Abstract <p>Ability of two neurovirulent strains (F and +GC (LPV) Miyama) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) to establish and maintain reactivatable latency in trigeminal ganglia (TG) was compared after intranasal inoculation of mice. The +GC (LPV) Miyama strain showed a very low rate of virus reactivation in explant cultures of TG, while the F strain showed a high rate of reactivation. These data indicate that neurovirulent strains of HSV-1 are not always competent for reactivatable latency, although most virulent strains of HSV-1 thus far reported were competent for reactivatable latency.&#60;/P&#62;</p>
Keywords herpes simplex virus type 1 neurovirulence latency reactivation
Amo Type Article
Published Date 1991-04
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume45
Issue issue2
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 117
End Page 121
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 1651044
Web of Science KeyUT A1991FL60800008
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32214
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Arao, Yujiro| Hatano, Atsushi| Yamada, Masao| Uno, Fumio| Nii, Shiro|
Abstract <p>In order to elucidate the mechanism of latent infection of herpes simplex virus (HSV), reactivatable latency of three avirulent strains (SKO-1B, -GCr Miyama, SKa) of HSV type 1 was comparatively examined in a mouse latency model. The SKO-1B strain showed high rate of virus reactivation from explanted trigeminal ganglia without n-butyrate enhancement, while the other two strains showed a very low rate of virus reactivation in the absence of n-butyrate. In the presence of n-butyrate, however, the rate of the -GCr Miyama strain jumped to a comparable level with that of SKO-1B, although the rate of SKa remained at a low level. A more precise follow-up experiment changing the virus dose highlighted the difference of the ability to reactivate from the latent state between SKO-1B and -GCr Miyama. Virus titer in trigeminal ganglia during acute phase, infectivity to cell lines of neural origin, and susceptibility to acyclovir and phosphonoacetate were assayed to know the reasons for the variation in the ability of reactivatable latency among these strains. It was concluded that the reduced infectivity to neural cells, and limited ability of reactivatable latency shown by the SKa strain could mainly be attributed to the deficiency of thymidine kinase activity.&#60;/P&#62;</p>
Keywords herpes simplex virus type 1 neurovirulence latency reactivation n-butyrate
Amo Type Article
Published Date 1991-02
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume45
Issue issue1
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 43
End Page 47
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 1648298
Web of Science KeyUT A1991FA75000006