ID 61274
Author
Nawara, Hend M. Laboratory of Nano‐Biotechnology, Division of Bioengineering and Drug Discovery, Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering in Health Systems, Okayama University
Afify, Said M. Laboratory of Nano‐Biotechnology, Division of Bioengineering and Drug Discovery, Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering in Health Systems, Okayama University ORCID
Hassan, Ghmkin Laboratory of Nano‐Biotechnology, Division of Bioengineering and Drug Discovery, Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering in Health Systems, Okayama University
Zahra, Maram H. Laboratory of Nano‐Biotechnology, Division of Bioengineering and Drug Discovery, Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering in Health Systems, Okayama University
Atallah, Marwa N. Department of Zoology, Vertebrates Embryology, and Comparative Anatomy, Faculty of Science, Menoufia University
Seno, Akimasa Laboratory of Nano‐Biotechnology, Division of Bioengineering and Drug Discovery, Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering in Health Systems, Okayama University ORCID Kaken ID publons researchmap
Seno, Masaharu Laboratory of Nano‐Biotechnology, Division of Bioengineering and Drug Discovery, Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering in Health Systems, Okayama University ORCID Kaken ID publons researchmap
Abstract
Angiogenesis is generally involved in tumor growth and metastasis. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered to facilitate the angiogenesis. Therefore, CSCs could be the effective targets to stop angiogenesis. Recently, our group successfully generated CSC models from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in the presence of conditioned medium derived from cancer derived cells. These novel model CSCs has been characterized by highly tumorigenic, angiogenic and metastatic potentials in vivo. The angiogenic potential of CSCs has been explained by the expression of both angiogenic factors and their receptors implying the angiogenesis in autocrine manner. In this protocol we optimized the method to evaluate tumor angiogenesis with the CSC model, which was described effective to assess sorafenib as an antiangiogenic drug, on chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. Our results demonstrate that CSCs developed from iPSCs and CAM assay are a robust and cost‐effective tool to evaluate tumor angiogenesis with CSCs. Collectively, CSCs in CAM assay could serve as a very useful model for the screening of potential therapeutic agents targeting tumor angiogenesis.
Keywords
cancer stem cells
chick chorioallantoic membrane
sorafenib
tumor angiogenesis
Note
This fulltext is available in December, 2021.
Published Date
2020-12-04
Publication Title
Cell Biology International
Publisher
Wiley
ISSN
1065-6995
NCID
AA10882014
Content Type
Journal Article
language
英語
OAI-PMH Set
岡山大学
File Version
author
PubMed ID
DOI
Web of Science KeyUT
Related Url
isVersionOf https://doi.org/10.1002/cbin.11511