ID 57087
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Author
Furumatsu, Takayuki Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School, Kaken ID publons
Okazaki, Yuki Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School,
Okazaki, Yoshiki Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School,
Hino, Tomohito Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School,
Kamatsuki, Yusuke Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School,
Masuda, Shin Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School,
Miyazawa, Shinichi Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School, ORCID
Nakata, Eiji Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School,
Hasei, Joe Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School,
Kunisada, Toshiyuki Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School,
Ozaki, Toshifumi Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School, Kaken ID researchmap
Abstract
INTRODUCTION:
Medial meniscus posterior root tear (MMPRT) can occur in middle-aged patients who have a posteromedial painful popping during light activities. MMPRTs are more common in patients with increased age, female gender, sedentary lifestyle, obesity, and varus knee alignment. However, injury mechanisms of minor traumatic MMPRTs are still unclear. We hypothesized that high flexion activities are the major cause of MMPRTs. The aim of this study was to clarify injury patterns of MMPRTs.
MATERIALS AND METHODS:
One hundred patients were diagnosed having MMPRTs after posteromedial painful popping episodes. Details of posteromedial painful popping episode, situation of injury, and position of injured leg were obtained from the patients by careful interviews. Injury patterns were divided into 8 groups: descending knee motion, walking, squatting, standing up action, falling down, twisting, light exercise, and minor automobile accident.
RESULTS:
A descending knee motion was the most common cause of MMPRTs (38%) followed by a walking injury pattern (18%) and a squatting action related to high flexion activities of the knee (13%). The other injury patterns were less than 10%.
DISCUSSION:
Descending knee motions associated with descending stairs, step, and downhill slope are the most common injury pattern of MMPRTs. High flexion activities of the knee are not the greatest cause of MMPRTs. Our results suggest that the descending action with a low knee flexion angle may trigger minor traumatic MMPRTs.
Keywords
Descending knee motion
Injury pattern
Medial meniscus
Posterior root tear
Squatting
Published Date
2019-02-28
Publication Title
Orthopaedics & Traumatology: Surgery & Research
Volume
volume105
Issue
issue1
Publisher
Elsevier
Start Page
107
End Page
111
ISSN
18770568
Content Type
Journal Article
language
英語
OAI-PMH Set
岡山大学
File Version
author
PubMed ID
DOI
Web of Science KeyUT
Related Url
isVersionOf https://doi.org/10.1016/j.otsr.2018.10.001
License
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/deed.ja
Citation
Takayuki Furumatsu, Yuki Okazaki, Yoshiki Okazaki, Tomohito Hino, Yusuke Kamatsuki, Shin Masuda, Shinichi Miyazawa, Eiji Nakata, Joe Hasei, Toshiyuki Kunisada, Toshifumi Ozaki, Injury patterns of medial meniscus posterior root tears, Orthopaedics & Traumatology: Surgery & Research, Volume 105, Issue 1, 2019, Pages 107-111, ISSN 1877-0568, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.otsr.2018.10.001.
Open Access (Publisher)
non-OA
Open Archive (publisher)
Non-OpenArchive