ID 56687
FullText URL
Author
Imamura, Daisuke Collaborative Research Center of Okayama University for Infectious Diseases in India, National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases
Mizuno, Tamaki Collaborative Research Center of Okayama University for Infectious Diseases in India, National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases
Miyoshi, Shin‐ichi
Shinoda, Sumio Collaborative Research Center of Okayama University for Infectious Diseases in India, National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases
Abstract
Many bacterial species are known to become viable but nonculturable (VBNC) under conditions that are unsuitable for growth. In this study, the requirements for resuscitation of VBNC-state Vibrio cholerae cells were found to change over time. Although VBNC cells could initially be converted to culturable by treatment with catalase or HT-29 cell extract, they subsequently entered a state that was not convertible to culturable by these factors. However, fluorescence microscopy revealed the presence of live cells in this state, from which VBNC cells were resuscitated by co-cultivation with HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells. Ultimately, all cells entered a state from which they could not be resuscitated, even by co-cultivation with HT-29. These characteristic changes in VBNC-state cells were a common feature of strains in both V. cholerae O1 and O139 serogroups. Thus, the VBNC state of V. cholerae is not a single property but continues to change over time.
Keywords
Vibrio cholerae
resuscitation
viable but nonculturable
Note
This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Wiley-Blackwell
Published Date
2015-02-09
Publication Title
Microbiology and immunology
Volume
volume59
Issue
issue5
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
Start Page
305
End Page
310
ISSN
03855600
NCID
AA00738350
Content Type
Journal Article
language
英語
OAI-PMH Set
岡山大学
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author
PubMed ID
DOI
Web of Science KeyUT
Related Url
isVersionOf https://doi.org/10.1111/1348-0421.12246
Project
Collaborative Research of Okayama University for Infectious Diseases in India