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Okura, Tomohiro Department of Residency Program, Okayama Saiseikai General Hospital
Fujii, Masakuni Department of Internal Medicine, Okayama Saiseikai General Hospital
Shiode, Junji Department of Internal Medicine, Okayama Saiseikai General Hospital
Ito, Yuri Department of Surgery, Okayama Saiseikai General Hospital
Kojima, Toru Center for Cancer Control and Statistics, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases
Nasu, Junichiro Department of Internal Medicine, Okayama Saiseikai General Hospital
Niguma, Takefumi Center for Cancer Control and Statistics, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases
Yoshioka, Masao Department of Internal Medicine, Okayama Saiseikai General Hospital
Mimura, Tetsushige Center for Cancer Control and Statistics, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases
Yamamoto, Kazuhide Department of Internal Medicine, Okayama Saiseikai General Hospital
Abstract
The impact of body mass index (BMI) on postoperative survival in Japanese patients with pancreatic cancer is unclear. We examined the relationship between preoperative BMI and the prognosis of Japanese patients who underwent surgery for pancreatic cancer to determine whether BMI affects these patients’ prognosis. Of the patients who underwent pancreatectomy between January 2004 and August 2015 at our institution, 246 were pathologically diagnosed with pancreatic tubular adenocarcinoma; the cancer was located in the pancreatic head (n=161) and in the body and tail (n=85). We classified the patients by BMI: underweight (n=22), normal weight (n=190), and overweight/obese (n=34) groups. We retrospectively analyzed medical records for patient characteristics, lesion location, disease stage, postoperative complications, chemotherapy, and prognosis. Lesion location, disease stage, postoperative complications, and chemotherapy were not significantly different among the BMI groups. The median survival times were as follows (days): all patients, 686; underweight, 485; normal weight, 694; and overweight/obese, 839. In a multivariate analysis, after adjusting for competing risk factors, low BMI was associated with an increased risk of death (normal weight: HR 0.58, p=0.038; overweight/obese: HR 0.54, p=0.059). High BMI was not found to be a postoperative factor for poor prognosis in Japanese pancreatic cancer patients.
Keywords
pancreatic cancer
BMI
prognosis
surgery
risk factor
Amo Type
Original Article
Published Date
2018-04
Publication Title
Acta Medica Okayama
Volume
volume72
Issue
issue2
Publisher
Okayama University Medical School
Start Page
129
End Page
135
ISSN
0386-300X
NCID
AA00508441
Content Type
Journal Article
language
英語
Copyright Holders
CopyrightⒸ 2018 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version
publisher
Refereed
True
PubMed ID