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Kobayashi, Katsuhiro Department of Child Neurology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Akiyama, Tomoyuki Department of Child Neurology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Agari, Takashi Department of Neurological Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Sasaki, Tatsuya Department of Neurological Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Shibata, Takashi Department of Child Neurology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Hanaoka, Yoshiyuki Department of Child Neurology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Akiyama, Mari Epilepsy Center, Okayama University Hospital
Endoh, Fumika Department of Child Neurology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Oka, Makio Epilepsy Center, Okayama University Hospital
Date, Isao Department of Child Neurology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences ORCID Kakenhi publons
Abstract
 Electroencephalogram (EEG) data include broadband electrical brain activity ranging from infra-slow bands (< 0.1 Hz) to traditional frequency bands (e.g., the approx. 10 Hz alpha rhythm) to high-frequency bands of up to 500 Hz. High-frequency oscillations (HFOs) including ripple and fast ripple oscillations (80-200 Hz and>200 / 250 Hz, respectively) are particularly of note due to their very close relationship to epileptogenicity, with the possibility that they could function as a surrogate biomarker of epileptogenicity. In contrast, physiological high-frequency activity plays an important role in higher brain functions, and the differentiation between pathological / epileptic and physiological HFOs is a critical issue, especially in epilepsy surgery. HFOs were initially recorded with intracranial electrodes in patients with intractable epilepsy as part of a long-term invasive seizure monitoring study. However, fast oscillations (FOs) in the ripple and gamma bands (40-80 Hz) are now noninvasively detected by scalp EEG and magnetoencephalography, and thus the scope of studies on HFOs /FOs is rapidly expanding.
Keywords
fast oscillations, epilepsy
electroencephalogram
time-frequency analysis
Amo Type
Review
Published Date
2017-06
Publication Title
Acta Medica Okayama
Volume
volume71
Issue
issue3
Publisher
Okayama University Medical School
Start Page
191
End Page
200
ISSN
0386-300X
NCID
AA00508441
Content Type
Journal Article
language
英語
Copyright Holders
CopyrightⒸ 2017 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version
publisher
Refereed
True
PubMed ID